Just Put Our Foot In It

Postally Unused:

foot_pe

From back of postcard:
“Footprints of the Stars–Forecourt of Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, where concrete slabs have captured the footprints, handprints and signatures of the movie stars of yesterday and today.”

Postally Unused:

day3_pe

From back of postcard:
“Grauman’s Chinese Theatre Hollywood California Motion picture star Doris Day placing her and footprints in this world famous forecourt.”

Ceremonies for Doris Day took place on January 19, 1961.

Postally Unused:

manns3_pe

From back of postcard:
“Mann’s Chinese Theatre-Hollywood, CA First opened in 1927, Hollywood’s most famous landmark where the footprints, handprints and signatures of the movie stars are preserved in cement.”

In 1973 Grauman’s was sold to Mann Theatres. Enter the Dragon started an eight week run on  August  24 of that year. It was Bruce Lee’s final completed film before his death on July 20, 1973.

TCL Chinese Theatre

Grauman’s Chinese Theatre

Grauman’s Chinese Theatre- A Fan Site

Postcards part of the Theatre TalkCollection, please ask permission to copy and/or use. At least give credit to source. We know that some people will not honor this but it would be nice if they did.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Private walks also available.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

Greetings from “The City of Goodwill”

Postally Unused (circa 1955)

seattle

On back of postcard:
“Spectacular view of Third Street looking south in the central business district.”

Double feature at the Garden (formerly the Winter Garden) Theatre:

Johnny Dark (1954)

The Man Without a Star (1955)

Winter Garden Theatre

Seattle Historical Sites

Postally Unused (circa 1962)

opera

Printed on back of postcard:
“Interior of Seattle’s beautiful Opera House with a seating capacity of 3077. Its near perfect acoustic and completely unobstructed seating make this concert hall one of the finest kn the world. Color photo by Max R. Jensen.”

Written on back:
“This opera house [?] built in time to open for last year’s World Fair. It is one of the fine permanent iconic center buildings and used by the Seattle Symphony Orchestra, local opera groups and outstanding attractions.” 
Unable to make out signature. Card addressed but apparently never sent.

Seattle Opera House

Tripadvisor

On a Budget

Postcards part of the Theatre TalkCollection, please ask permission to copy and/or use. At least give credit to source. We know that some people will not honor this but it would be nice if they did.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Private walks also available.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

Wheeling–the “nail capital of the world”

” the manufacture of cut iron nails became a major element of Wheeling’s economy and Wheeling became known as the ‘nail capital of the world.'”–Our History, City of Wheeling, WV-Home Page

Postmarked August 23, 1958:

rex

Back of Postcard: “Market Street looking north. Extachrome by Jack Taylor”

Playing at the Rex Theatre: Bing Crosby in “Here Comes The Groom” (1951)

Ohio County Public Library:
“Designed by Wheeling architect Edward Bates Franzheim, construction began on the 900-seat Rex Theater in 1914.
WWVA broadcast its weekly live music program, WWVA Jamboree in the Rex Theater from 1962 to 1965.
In later years, it was called the Coronet Theater. It was demolished in 1989 and replaced by one-story expansion structure of Wheeling Office Supply.”

Gone Forever-Wheeling’s Theatres

The Wheeling Jamboree

Postally Unused:

victoria

Back of Postcard: “Street scene Wheeling, W. Va.”

Victoria Theatre, 1228 Market Street

West Virginia Tourism:
“First opening its doors in 1904, Victoria Theater is the oldest operating theater in West Virginia. Located in the registered historic market district of Wheeling, the Victoria is a 720 seat Victorian style theater with many Beaux-Arts design influences.
In 1934 the Victoria Theater served for a short period as home to the WWVA Jamboree. Today, the Victoria Theater, also known as the Victoria Vaudeville serves as a venue for live acts.”

West Virginia Historic Theatre Trail

Ohio County Public Library

Postcards part of the Theatre TalkCollection, please ask permission to copy and/or use. At least give credit to source. We know that some people will not honor this but it would be nice if they did.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Private walks also available.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

Los Angeles Aglow

Postmarked September 5, 1944:

losangeles

On back of postcard:
“Broadway at night, in downtown Los Angeles, is aglow with brilliant lights. The many attractive shops, theatres and cafes afford great interest to visitors of the Southland.”

The Los Angeles Theatre is on the right with the Palace opposites, vertical sign in red. The white verticals of the Loew’s State are in the background just beyond Bullock’s.

Postally Unused:

state

“Seventh and Broadway is the hub of activity upon whici the City of Los Angeles constantly revolves. Its daily passing parade reflects a true cross section of the population of this metropolis of the West.”

Loew’s State

Postally Unused (1941):

united

Double feature at the United Artists Theatre: “Smilin’ Through” and “Dr. Kildare’s Wedding Day.”

The Orpheum vertical is on the right.

Tumblr

Theatre Talks

Postcards part of the Theatre TalkCollection, please ask permission to copy and/or use. At least give credit to source. We know that some people will not honor this but it would be nice if they did.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Private walks also available.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

Greetings from Kearney the Sandhill Crane Capital

“Kearney is known as the best place in Nebraska to view the annual spring sandhill crane migration”–Travel Awaits

Postally Unused:

empresspe

Kearney Hub:
“The theater opened on Sept. 21, 1914, as the Empress Theatre. Its main floor and the balcony seated 654. Admission was 5 cents, 10 cents or 15 cents, depending on location. The theater burned down in 1940.

In 1941, it was rebuilt and named The Fort Theatre. Seating was reduced to 450 with new “love seats” at the ends of every other row that allowed two people to sit together. The theater closed in September 1993 and became Pony’s Bar for about 14 months.”

Postmarked September 7, 1953:

fort1

Roadside Architecture:
“The building now houses Fort Theatre Dentistry. The marquee was adapted and is still lit at night.

Fort Theatre Dentistry

On the above marquee:
The Black Book (1949)

Yes Sir, Mr. Bones (1951))

 

Postcards part of the Theatre Talks Collection, please ask permission to copy and/or use. At least give credit to source. We know that some people will not honor this but it would be nice if they did.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Private walks also available.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

“Follow Me to Tennessee”

“Follow me to Tennessee
It’s where all the action is.
Follow me to Tennessee.”
–from the song by Michael Stegner
 
 
Postally Unused:
 

Visit Clarksville:
The present Roxy Theatre opened in 1947, showing first-run movies until 1980. In 1983, the Roxy Regional Theatre opened for live theatre and in 1995, a professional company was created to supply the great demand for Shakespeare, other classics, school curriculum-based productions and holiday shows.”

Roxy Regional Theatre

City Moves Forward on new Roxy building.

 
Postally Unused:
 

From back of postcard:
“Memphis is the greatest inland cotton market in the world, the world’s largest hardwood lumber producing market, located on the east bank of the Mississippi River, about midway between the Great Lakes and the Gulf of Mexico.”

Bette Davis in Marked Woman (1937) at the Warner.

Lost Memphis:
“I’ve written before about the grand old Warner Theater. Erected on Main Street in 1921, and originally called the Pantages Theatre, this 1,900-seat showplace was one of the largest and most popular movie palaces in town.”

Memphis Magazine:
“One of Memphis’ grandest theatres was demolished to make way for Commerce Square.”

Historic Memphis

Postcards part of the Theatre Talks Collection, please ask permission to copy and/or use. At least give credit to source. We know that some people will not honor this but it would be nice if they did.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Private walks also available.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

Deep in the Heart of Texas

Postally Unused:

Lonely Planet:
“The 1915 Aztec Theater, the first Mayan Revival–style movie theater in the US, was a center of Eagle Pass community life until it closed in 1983. It’s currently being used as retail space, but you can still admire the renovated architecture.”

Bullock Museum

 

Postally Unused:
Polk Street-“The Best Lighted “Main Street’ in America”

Playing at the Paramount: Honolulu with Eleanor Powell and Robert Young

Downtown TX:
“Built in 1932, The Paramount Theater was Amarillo’s finest movie theater. The building was designed by architect, W Scott Dunne and constructed by Charles S. Lambie. The two story, Terra cotta-clad building showed movies until March 20, 1975, and was later converted into office spaces in 1978. The lobby has been restored to include some of the original light sconces and the original water fountain. The 33.5-foot neon lighted sign was restored in 2006. The building now houses offices of the second floor, while the first floor is an upscale sushi bar, Rain and a nationally known coffee shop, Palace coffee.”

Amarillo Globe-News

 

Postcards part of the Theatre Talks Collection, please ask permission to copy and/or use. At least give credit to source. We know that some people will not honor this but it would be nice if they did.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Private walks also available.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

 

Shuffle Off to Buffalo

Postally unused, circa 1916:

“Washington Street, seen here looking north from Lafayette Square in 1916, was second only to Main Street in urban intensity. At the left is the Olympic Theatre, a motion picture and vaudeville house opened in 1914. Next door is Seames & Zeitler’s Park Hof, a German restaurant, beer hall, and cabaret built in 1908. At the right, the New Family Theatre advertises five cent ‘photoplays,’ an antiquated term for motion picture.”

From The Public , “Western New York’s true alternative media source” 

In the background is the New Lyric offering movies and vaudeville.

Postally Unused:

On the marquee at Shea’s Buffalo: “Sol Hurok Presents Sadler Wells Theatre Ballet”.

“When Shea’s Buffalo Theatre was made a National Historic Site in 1975, restoration began in earnest to return the theater to its original appearance as it was when “The Wonder Theatre” opened in January 1926. From hand-stenciling over 7,000 square feet of walls to repairing the Mighty Wurlitzer organ, we continue with our restoration efforts to this day.”

From their website

Postcards part of the Theatre Talks Collection, please ask permission to copy and/or use. At least give credit to source. We know that some people will not honor this but it would be nice if they did.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Private walks also available.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

Greetings from a World Premiere

Postally Unused, 1956

From back of postcard:
“The Chinese Theatre has been the scene of many gala world premieres. Thousands of cheering fans line the streets and gather outside the theatre, to enthusiastically greet the hundreds of illustrious stars and celebrities that attend.”

TLC Chinese Theatre

Grauman’s Chinese Theatre

Forecourt of Stars

 

Postally Unused:

From back of postcard:
“Carthay Circle Theatre, scene of many a gala Premiere, where throngs of movie fns collect to see the celebrities attending.”

Carthay Circle Theatre

Carthay Circle Theatre-Little Known Facts

 

Postally Unused:

 From back of postcard:

“The only theatre of it’s kind in the world. Located in the Cinerama Center, Sunset and Ivar, Hollywood, it is the first geodesic dome in concrete anywhere in the world. It is the first major theatre built in Hollywood in 35 years.

It is an endless network of electronic marvels.  Gold is the dominant color in the richly fabricated carpet and drapes. Striking innovations in lighting and luxurious seating provide unbelievable comfort and beauty.” 

Cinerama Dome

Save the Cinerama Dome 

 

 

Postcards part of the Theatre Talks Collection, please ask permission to copy and/or use. At least give credit to source. We know that some people will not honor this but it would be nice if they did.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Private walks also available.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

My Kind of Town

My kind of town, Chicago is
My kind of town, Chicago is
My kind of razzmatazz
And it has all that jazz”

composed by Jimmy Van Heusen with lyrics by Sammy Cahn

 

Postally Unused

From back of postcard:
“Chicago’s State Street features the famous Chicago Theatre among many hot spots.”

 

Chicago Theatre

 

Postally Unused (circa 1947):

State Lake Theatre

Telenews Theatre

History of State Street: How it Remained a Great Street

League of Chicago Theatres

 

Postcard part of the Theatre Talks Collection, please ask permission to copy and/or use. At least give credit to source. We know that some people will not honor this but it would be nice if they did.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Private walks also available.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom